Posted by: masterwarlord | March 27, 2012

MW Top 13s – Junahu Sets

As always, this list is simply another poll winner – you have the entirety of MYM’s sadistic tendencies to blame for your venom filled cesspool of a list this time. As a foreword, Junahu is trying to achieve something entirely different than I am in movesetting, anything that goes towards my values is more often than not an unintended “bonus”. Of course, I will judge them by my own standards anyway first and foremost, but something that’s particularly amusing is when some of these sets fail to fulfill even Junahu’s abstract purposes.

13 – Cutesy Beau – MYM 5

You’ve heard about Cutesy’s tl;dr factor plenty enough times by now. It really wouldn’t be so memorable of a thing if it wasn’t Junahu as the author of all people. . .In any case, the set has an awkward mechanic that generates the majority of creativity in the moveset, with a mechanic that largely handles itself, is out of the control of players for the most part, and isn’t that particularly relevant as it’s essentially just a very, very fancy way of telling how long a leaf has left to live. The rest of the set is one of those sets where you just manipulate leaves, pushing them about for flinching hitboxes this way and that, with almost non existent use of the scythe for something that’s supposed to pass as the Grim Reaper in the Junaverse. A set that tries to introduce everything via a mechanic at the start and then is left to be a snorefest for the rest of the entire set isn’t one that’s going to gather votes, assuming the voters aren’t the infants of MYM 5 anyway, and this is why Junahu later tries to hide it in his other sets by placing the big thing at the end. When the “draw” of the set is so drawn out and pointless and you realize what you just read was the “pay-off”, it’s a pretty damn bad experience to look back on.

12 – Victini – MYM 10

This moveset isn’t particularly bad, it’s just the definition of forgettable – nobody went on about their hatred of this set, but nobody was exactly complimenting it either. It was acknowledged as a token set from early on in the contest, then MYM moved on and forgot it ever existed. The moveset has a little too much going on at once to really stomach properly, but it’s not going for a token Junahu versatility set, no, it’s a rather focused offensive set with some survivability elements thrown in to go with his theme of “winning”, because other movesets apparently do not intend to win (Then again, Sandshrew exists). Or I’d say, it intends to be a focused set, but has too many elements competing for attention, and the formerly praised parts of the set where Victini approach age after MYM 11 destroyed any positive meanings of the word “momentum”.

11 – Minnie the Minx – MYM 11

Well, this is one of two sets on the list that Junahu actually dislikes. On the surface, you’d think it’d be because of the MYM 4 tacky nature, with moves that don’t do what you’d expect them to do and specials that aren’t particularly special – it’d have been a competent candidate for top 26 tacky had I read it before this point. A particularly obvious example is a –Side Special- which is just an awkward walking animation that somehow gives Minnie superarmor. Ironically, this influence from reading too much of David’s stuff is not what makes Junahu dislike the set – rather, it’s that the set’s playstyle is too focused, or at least presented as such – AKA it tries to have one. Not to say it does a particularly good job of that with being a “trap char” with 3 generic traps and having a gimping game kinda sorta thrown in, bringing back memories of such invigorating playstyles as Bleak which we’ve long progressed past.

10 – Mask De’Masque – MYM 11

This is one of them thar versatility movesets, though I find it kind of difficult to really buy into it that much regardless of the playstyle force feeding this to me when it’s so centered around a cage to abstractly represent him framing the foe – since he frames people he traps them inside cages to fight! He teleports inside the cage to fight the foe with his not particularly competent set, drags them inside the cage, or holds them down by riding on top of them with an awkward as hell dair before caging them, then pushes it off the stage to gimp them. To give you an idea of just how nonsensical pretty much everything unrelated to this random cage is, they’re all attacks intended to emulate one of his existing movesets – the jab is a kick from Regal, and the usmash is a bloody hospital bed from Nurse Joy. Then the dsmash came around and Junahu just ran out of material, so he stole Snake’s dsmash as the only non-Junahu moveset. This is yet another one of those movesets where Junahu intentionally has you re-read everything by having the cage at the end, yet it’s almost entirely pointless due to it being a token versatility based set. All of your moves contribute to your goal – they all deal damage and knockback, don’t you see? You need no less than 15 attacks dedicated to this exclusive purpose. This is completely relevant to the rest of your game.

9 – Alucard – MYM 7

This set’s pretty much the epitome of versatility for versatility, pretending that splattering moves about at random with no intended purposes enables this. The entirety of the standards is dedicated to something as vague as “spacing”. Junahu even has an impressive diagram to show you which move would be an ideal move to use next after you use one move! Be aware that this varies based off damage percentage and the enemy’s reaction, as well as that such a chart can be made for any char in the game.

Not to worry, though, as Alucard has a trick up his sleeve to try to be more versatile than the Brawl sets, though, in his MYM 4 style Specials which are essentially 20 uncreative Specials in one. One lets him summon a minion out of a list, one lets him summon a prop out of a list, one lets him transform into something out of a list, and one gives him a handful of different attacks out of a list based off him inputting the ever so casual friendly and In-Smash Street Fighter style button combinations. With so many things you can do, it must be the epitome of versatility! Because Rocket Grunt, N. Brio, and Urabrask are clearly less versatile than this set and this is the one who can pass off versatility as a legitimate playstyle.

8 – Zigzagoon – MYM 10

This is largely the only moveset Junahu has made unwillingly – while he’s occasionally participated in movements before, it’s generally more to mock said movements or something he was already doing anyway. This was something Junahu was dared to do and was posted in the same context as the beloved Goomba. Zigzagoon is required to be highly evasive and unpredictable in this moveset by zigging and sagging into the various Z planes with A and B while chucking various items as them he gathers via Pick-Up – the meatiest part of the set input wise is the grab-game of all things. When I said zigging and sagging with A and B, I meant it quite literally, as this eats up the majority of the functions of these two buttons – spot dodging while in motin, AKA the rolls that every other single character has, is supposed to enable Zigzagoon to be more “versatile”. Goomba has an entire set full of generic inputs where he rams foes with he desperately attempts to kill himself, why not Zigzagoon?

7 – Dry Bones – MYM 12

Dry Bones is a set which brings up the skeletal disjointed body parts from Potato Head, but only briefly, downplaying both it and Dry Bones’ character in favor of a bunch of luck based body alterations, the “defects”. The intent is to go with the flow to make Dry Bones more unpredictable, but Dry Bones is going to be spamming his Down Special healing (Where he –intentionally- does his death animation to somehow heal himself at a stupidly fast rate) which instantly cures all of these defects. Dry Bones’s broken healing could perhaps be toned down, but that is pretty much the entire point of the character, the durability, as that’s the only thing other than a skin and the inability to use the shell to differentiate it from a standard issue Koopa Troopa. The Down B is the only instance of it in the entire set with the focus being on other random skeletal things, and not particularly interesting ones at that when Skeleton’s playstyle is brought up briefly with decapitating yourself, but tossed aside.

6 – Item Tree – MYM 8

The Item Tree is a moveset that can be pretty much described in name alone, bringing Joe out of the woodworks for a hate train that hasn’t been seen since. Now, a moveset that’s self aware that spawns random items wouldn’t necessairily have to be completely terrible on principle alone, but the Item Tree. . .Well, it’s pretty much if Ganondorf’s specials were replaced with item spawning. It could be applied to any set’s the point, as the Item Tree’s actual moves have very little to contribute in letting the tree actually work alongside the various items she can spawn – nor do they take advantage of the solid nature of her foliage or her size in particular, for that matter. Yes, I know I have to adapt to play with items in this set, Junahu, I need you to give me some actual tools to adapt to them with is the thing. A generic super-heavyweight slow as balls character isn’t exactly giving me a lot of options other than just spamming items in a very traditional manner, which is something the playstyle summary makes it sound like Junahu is trying to (Rightfully) avoid.

5 – Penny Gadget – MYM 9

This is a moveset made for Junahu’s infamous “Penny in Peril” fetish, where you –want- to get Penny in trouble – you want to get grabbed and take it up the ass, even advised by the playstyle, as that’s the only way to summon Gadget. There’s no real way of knowing what triggers this summon due to the nature of the invisible counter, leaving a casual player unaware of just how to summon Gadget and leaving them to actually attempt to fight them with Penny’s god-awful moveset. Yes, a miniscule amount of points are given for attacking the foe, but with how (Very intentionally) terrible her moveset is it’s ill advised. True, in casual matches the point of the set can be summoned via Final Smash, but that’s Junahu going and making one of those mechanic booster Final Smashes he hates so much. Once you finally do summon Gadget, he’s still as hopelessly incompetent as usual thanks to you being in control of the utterly useless moveset – you still have to take it up the ass once Gadget is summoned, but you’re taking it from an AI partner rather than the foe, essentially serving as nothing other than as a failsafe to prevent Gadget from being infinite’d due to his AI status.

What particularly convinces me of this moveset as fetish fuel for Junahu is that he’s very much well aware that Penny usually ends up saving Gadget rather than visa versa, being super hyper competent with tech that an evil scientist shouldn’t have the right to invent, let alone a minor. . .But the focus here is on Gadget saving Penny, with Junahu specifically making the AI more intelligent than a regular one to boot.

4 – Megaman 9 Megaman/Megaman 10 Protoman – MYM 4/8

These sets have the same basic premise and are combined to avoid redundancy. This is needless to say a lot more repulsive when it rears its’ ugly head in 8, though at the least the 8 version doesn’t have a list of extras so long that it’s almost impossible to find the actual set contained within (Though still somewhat difficult). It really goes to show just how mediocre 8 was that there was nothing to edge this garbage out of the top 40 – it almost deserved the placing. Almost.

The set makes Sonic and Tails look like it has a competent amount of inputs to fight foes with, as Megaman/Protoman must cycle through the only attack in their entire arsenal outside of a useless little slide attack. Sure, if all of these moves were assigned to different inputs he might have a competent set, but Megaman has to go out of his way to select a different weapon while still being perfectly vulnerable to counter-attack. Not only this, but if you try to avoid swapping weapons, you’ll eventually run out of bloody ammo, and be –forced- to switch, making you all the more predictable. This character begs to be pressured more than even the infamous MYM 5 set-up characters, and makes Sonic and Tails look competent. Making them play as they did in their game? Well, I guess Mario can only jump and shoot fireballs now. Hope you don’t have to fight Guile, Nightmare, Bob, or somebody like that.

3 – Dragonite – MYM 11

Anything after the likes of MM9 MM has to be truly atrocious if it still uses the traditional Brawl control scheme, but Junahu somehow manages to deliver. I lied when I said Zigzagoon was Jun’s only forced set, as Dragonite was forced upon him by the random number generator – it killed the short-lived Universal Pokemon thing, though I wish it could’ve continued just to showcase that even a Phatcat Dragonite set couldn’t be worse than this.

This is still a wild Dragonite, not one used by Lance or whoever, yet still has a good chunk of various elemental attacks in it for the sake of it. The set attempts to play off of Dragonite’s speed from the Pokedex for one of the main focuses, turning Dragonite into a token momentum character, but at the same time it also focuses on Dragonite’s acid trip Dream World ability (An immediate red flag in and of itself) Multiscale, which gives Dragonite superarmor so long as it attempts to stand still. This comes across much more awkwardly than the momentum, as Dragonite’s many movement based attacks do not count as “moving”, yet still give Dragonite the bonus, and these movement based attacks don’t work with Dragonite’s momentum. Now, here’s the real clincher that warrants the set being this far down the list. . .You’re supposed to use these playstyles of standing still and momentum at the same time. Just let that sink in a moment.

2 – Team Rocket – MYM 5

This moveset doesn’t exactly need a whole lot of detailing when it was the winner of a two part list that was written a mere two weeks ago. It is the definition of tackiness, an extremely rare moveset that Junahu has actually disowned, and is Junahu very blatantly out of his element and failing badly to pander to the environment around him. The sheer level of tackiness has already been covered, and all of this tackiness is try to accommodate for. . .One of those MYM 5 set-up style characters. And the character is two desynched characters, so you have a lot to defend during your elaborate, insanely luck based set-up involving random (Non-Brawl) item generation. This isn’t one of those sets like Item Tree where you’re supposed to adapt with what you’re given either, most of the items outside the ones actually worth doing this garbage for are utterly useless, to the point they may as well not be there at all outside of giving you even more to read. The Wobbuffet set listed at the end of this one puts this crap to shame.

1 – Linebeck – MYM 11

More-so than Inspector and Penny Gadget, this moveset in particular completely demands that Toon Link not be playable in the same game, and that his existing Brawl set is reduced to NPC status. Something people tend to ignore in this set is that Linebeck isn’t doing absolutely nothing and letting the match play out – the obvious thing to do is to use the Down Special to gain direct control over Tink. While this only lasts 6 seconds, you can still force Tink to use any attack so long as you’re close to him without the Down Special anyway. With this strategy, Linebeck can use his throws on Tink to control his movement vaguely without synching up to him. Essentially, the entire set you’re going to be playing very awkwardly as Tink.

While this might seem like a downgrade, Linebeck can eventually come out for a blatant upgrade to be superior to Tink, then go back in the background when he’s damaged to remove any risk factor whatsoever that was involved. He’s still perfectly useful in the background, punishing the foes who dodge the Tink which he is actively controlling. What he punishes with hardly matters in his mess of an actual moveset if the mechanic is ignored, just stun them so Tink can hit them. This moveset has you playing as Tink far more-so than Linebeck, when the intention is supposed to be the horrible, horrible moveset that Junahu wants it to be and the common man buys hook line and sinker – Linebeck doing literally nothing as Tink fights for him, as apparently the lot of you hate Brawl so much you don’t want to play it even when forced to. Due to how irrelevant Linebeck himself is to everything himself here, the moveset comes across as particularly casual unfriendly when you have to influence Tink so goddamn awkwardly rather than controlling him directly, outside the whole 6 seconds you get from the Down Special. Linebeck is the superior tier placing, but nobody would actually want to play as Linebeck over Tink, a pretty damn big lose-lose scenario for this abomination. For all of that talk about “fun” in Rainbow Dash, I really don’t have a fucking clue how Junahu can turn around and make a set like this.

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Responses

  1. I don’t get this list. Are top 13s supposed to be negative?

    • Eeyup. Top 10s are positive and Top 13s are negative. Unlucky number 13, I guess. That, or Warlord just has more to say when he’s being negative about sets. 😛

    • Oooooh, okay.

  2. Top 13 Smashbot

    >mfw Top 666 Kupa is the only one with votes
    >the only one
    >with votes

    • Nobody knows what it means, so that’s why they’re all voting for it! I know this because I was like, the 4th guy to do so.

  3. “More-so than Inspector and Penny Gadget, this moveset in particular completely demands that Toon Link not be playable in the same game, and that his existing Brawl set is reduced to NPC status.”

    Don’t agree with this at all. Having a separate Toon Link set in the same game would hardly create game-breaking inconsistency issues, so long as that Toon Link and the one that spawns with Linebeck have the same moveset.

    The majority of the description past this point is written under the presumption that Linebeck players have some kind of disturbing control fetish and will just do everything in their power to play as Toon Link no matter what – they could have picked Tink at the CSS if that’s what they wanted. No-one on earth would play Linebeck the way you have described because, as you have pointed out, it is horribly unfun. I could probably write up a few paragraphs about how Antonidas is a terrible moveset because it’s awkward to play him as a rushdown character, but criticizing a moveset based on what it would be like to play it an extremely counter-intuitive way that goes against the playstyle is hardly fair.

    Linebeck plays much more naturally as a guardian and coach of the AI Tink, sticking mostly to his handful of foreground-striking attacks, and manipulation moves like the bomb and cannon. These don’t just have to be used for punishment – what foe is going to try to roll away from Link when one of these babies is aimed right at the background behind them? Linebeck has his ways of playing with the opponent, and he can always use an Up Smash or a Forward Smash to intervene directly in the Brawl – most likely to save Tink’s ass, but in the case of the Dash Attack, potentially even to finish off a foe that Tink has weakened up – the thing Kos from 100%, after all.

    “While this might seem like a downgrade, Linebeck can eventually come out for a blatant upgrade to be superior to Tink, then go back in the background when he’s damaged to remove any risk factor whatsoever that was involved.”

    Not really. Jun explicitly states that Linebeck stays out for four times as long as you spent drinking. He doesn’t give you another way to retreat, which makes drinking extremely risky.

  4. “The majority of the description past this point is written under the presumption that Linebeck players have some kind of disturbing control fetish and will just do everything in their power to play as Toon Link no matter what – they could have picked Tink at the CSS if that’s what they wanted.”

    It does when there’s little point to just sitting in the background and indirectly aiding the AI at a rate of about one attack per 15 seconds when there’s so much more you can do. Your existence just feels so pointless outside of Down B and controlling Tink. When there’s absolutely no risk to anything you’re doing in the background, shouldn’t you be trying to do as much as you can, be as active as possible?

    Aside from just controlling Tink, you can go onto the battlefield as Linebeck. Yes, you can’t go back on demand, but you can choose how long to stay in the fight in advance. If at a higher percentage, you can come out for just a couple seconds to hit the foe with a particular attack or two. If you’re coming out early on and due to your own incompetent play get more damaged than was healthy, you can just run for the remainder of time that you’re out, which works pretty bloody well when you have an AI to distract the foe for you. 120% damage doesn’t matter when you know you’re going to gain perma invulnerability in a short time.

    “Don’t agree with this at all. Having a separate Toon Link set in the same game would hardly create game-breaking inconsistency issues, so long as that Toon Link and the one that spawns with Linebeck have the same moveset.”

    Linebeck is superior to Tink in every way competitively, largely due to that moveset being identical with a whole bunch of other crap added on. It’s Tink with tons of added perks.

  5. “Aside from just controlling Tink, you can go onto the battlefield as Linebeck. Yes, you can’t go back on demand, but you can choose how long to stay in the fight in advance. If at a higher percentage, you can come out for just a couple seconds to hit the foe with a particular attack or two.”

    There’s still a risk factor in coming out on the stage, especially since any non-handicapped opponent will notice you getting drunk, which does a pretty good job of telegraphing exactly where you’re going to pop out of the background.

    “If you’re coming out early on and due to your own incompetent play get more damaged than was healthy, you can just run for the remainder of time that you’re out, which works pretty bloody well when you have an AI to distract the foe for you. 120% damage doesn’t matter when you know you’re going to gain perma invulnerability in a short time. Linebeck is superior to Tink in every way competitively, largely due to that moveset being identical with a whole bunch of other crap added on. It’s Tink with tons of added perks.”

    Because running away from the foe is so easy when you have crap ground speed and super-tripping. And it’s not like there’s no risk in having two active hurtboxes on the stage at once – they both draw from the same stock pool, and one powerful attack could drain two stocks in an instant. Which would certainly qualify as an added drawback, don’t you think? They don’t even share a damage gauge – if they’re both at high percentages and you kill one, the other remains quite vulnerable. Which leads us into the next bit, I suppose. . .

    “It does when there’s little point to just sitting in the background and indirectly aiding the AI at a rate of about one attack per 15 seconds when there’s so much more you can do. Your existence just feels so pointless outside of Down B and controlling Tink. When there’s absolutely no risk to anything you’re doing in the background, shouldn’t you be trying to do as much as you can, be as active as possible?”

    Sticking to just controlling Tink to minimize risk will indeed minimize your risk. But I don’t think it will get you very far. Heck, the effect ends the very instant either character (probably Tink, but with all of MYM’s crazy background attackers, ya never know) takes knockback, and Linebeck can’t sync up again until he gets close. Constantly trying to sync up again will most likely prove to be a tremendous hassle, as the effect is disrupted every time Tink takes a hit. So what does Linebeck do instead when Tink gets sent sailing? He starts going after the foe himself, because Tink isn’t man enough to handle his own fights. (This is especially true in free-for-alls, where it would be all but impossible to sync up for long periods of time) No matter what happens, Linebeck is going to have to do some of the fighting, or just watch Tink fail. No, syncing isn’t useless, but I think it’s best used when you have something specific you want Tink to do, not just as a rule of thumb.

  6. clearly this entire list is bunk because Ditto isn’t on it

    13- MYM5 was pretty crazy huh? We had movesets that felt like actual Projects to make, and to read. We were excited for these things
    12- This is why, as much as I rarely agree, I like it when you speak up against a moveset I made. So many people just awkwardly look at their shoes, and then act indignant years later when I’m oblivious to how hated the set really was. Still, you don’t get too many sets for legendary Pokemon, there’s no real prescedent
    11- Like with Nurse Joy’s props, I was very careful about how and when to pile on the tackiness. I do like the overall effect of the moveset as it plays out, it’s just the route the player is funnelled through isn’t all too memorable.
    10- The attacks were actually chosen based on their effects first, and then matched up to a similar Junahu input. Snake down smash was because the moveset absolutely needed a bomb, and none of my movesets really delivered that kind of input. The accusations of versatility I don’t really get, I thought the goals and methods were pretty specific.
    9- rowr. It’s the best moveset ever made. Putting Alucard on even a hundred Top13 lists won’t change that.
    8- A full traditional moveset would be pointless for Zigzagoon
    7- it’s a skeleton koopa troopa. I’m not giving it some expansive multilayered slow-grow playstyle, weight in the double digits, or super armor for no reason. It’s a goddamn mook, it’ll take its goddamn mook moveset and like it.
    6- Explicitly working well with items, such as having attacks that synergise really well, or outright manipulating the items, would run counter to what the Item Tree was supposed to be. Simply being the vector through which items appear is synergy enough, though it’s really not like I just slapped items onto a tree moveset and called it a day
    5- The moveset is exactly what she does in the show; try to hack something, get caught, try and fail to fight back, have brain rescue you, repeat until Inspector Gadget flails his gadgets in a way that beats the villain. I shouldn’t have claimed that throwing yourself at the foe was the way to play, because that’s about as dumb as it gets. Then again a lot of my playstyle sections make these stupid claims, such as when I said you’re supposed to play both types of Dragonite symultaneously. I try to draw people’s attention towards alternative ways of playing in the playstyle sections. I frequently phrase it poorly, and thus we get playstyle sections like these
    4- Simulacrum movesets are fucking hard ya know? I eagerly await the day someone comes and shows me how one of these kinds of movesets are ‘supposed’ to be made.
    3- I don’t get how Dragonite can really kill the Universal Pokemon movement. I mean, it’s not like the first Bear Hugger killed the Punch Out movement. In fact, it disturbs me how no one has made a Dragonite moveset since mine. You know… to show me how terrible my moveset really is?
    2- no objections here
    1- I agree with everything n88 is saying on this subject.

  7. Okay, who voted Top 10 Kupa sets (CRS)


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